Julia by Ramon Casas Carbo, 1915

Julia by Ramon Casas Carbo, 1915


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fashionsfromhistory: Ensemble Maison Martin Margiela Spring/Summer 2017 The MET fashionsfromhistory: Ensemble Maison Martin Margiela Spring/Summer 2017 The MET fashionsfromhistory: Ensemble Maison Martin Margiela Spring/Summer 2017 The MET

fashionsfromhistory:

Ensemble

Maison Martin Margiela

Spring/Summer 2017

The MET


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Painting of Inuit woman Mikak and her son Tukauk by John Russell, 1769Mikak (c.1740 – October 1, 179

Painting of Inuit woman Mikak and her son Tukauk by John Russell, 1769

Mikak(c.1740 – October 1, 1795[1]), also known as Micoc,Mykok, or Mecock, was born in Labrador, Canada and died at Nain,Newfoundland and Labrador. She was one of several Inuit people to travel to Europe and return to North America, although many Inuit who had traveled to Europe subsequently died from diseases, especially smallpox, before returning.

Mikak, daughter of Inuk chief Nerkingoak, was very influential in creating friendly relationships between traders from Europe and native Labradoreans. She was one of the first Inuit to appear in recorded history.


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Courtesan with Child Attendants, by Kondo Katsunobu, Edo period Japan, Kyoho era, 1716-36

Courtesan with Child Attendants, by Kondo Katsunobu, Edo period Japan, Kyoho era, 1716-36


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Eastern Beauty by Leon Francois Comerre

Eastern Beauty by Leon Francois Comerre


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Art by Daniel O’Keefe

Art by Daniel O’Keefe


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Gustav Pope, Three Daughters of King Lear, 1875-1876

Gustav Pope, Three Daughters of King Lear, 1875-1876


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Bone art by Jess EatonBone art by Jess EatonBone art by Jess EatonBone art by Jess EatonBone art by Jess EatonBone art by Jess Eaton

Bone art by Jess Eaton


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Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”

Iris van Herpen, spring 2019, “Shift Souls”


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A Token of Love by Achille Mollica

A Token of Love by Achille Mollica


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A Harem Beauty by Henri-Guillaume Schlesinger

A Harem Beauty by Henri-Guillaume Schlesinger


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saltwort:had to paint Janelle Monae’s Met gala look this year (on twitter).

saltwort:

had to paint Janelle Monae’s Met gala look this year (on twitter).


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5ovspades:The talented and spirited Miss Rey, who lives in the homeliest little wizard tower surroun

5ovspades:

The talented and spirited Miss Rey, who lives in the homeliest little wizard tower surrounded by a green forest, on the other side of the mountains from the much more dreary Empire ruled by Kinglo Ren (and Minister Huggs).


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Paper Shaman by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Paper Shaman by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Paper Shaman by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Paper Shaman by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Paper Shaman by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Paper Shaman by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)

Paper Shaman by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)


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Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)

Mongolian fashions executed in paper by Asya Kozina (click to enlarge)


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Paper masks by Asya KozinaPaper masks by Asya KozinaPaper masks by Asya KozinaPaper masks by Asya KozinaPaper masks by Asya KozinaPaper masks by Asya KozinaPaper masks by Asya Kozina

Paper masks by Asya Kozina


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Color clashing is culturally determined.

For instance, I was always taught that hot pink and bright red should NEVER go together (except maybe on Valentine’s Day). 

(Mother says NO)

However, I have seen bright red and hot pink in clothing from other cultures, and not only does it not appear to be considered a clash, I have to say that I think it looks really pretty!

(YES)

My brother once put on a maroon t-shirt and some light-blue snow camouflage pants and asked me if they clashed.

“YES,” I said, shielding my eyes from the glare. “THAT’S HIDEOUS.”

(IMAGINE)

And yet… I would never say THIS clashed:

So really, “clashing colors” have nothing to do with the colors themselves or how they affect humans biologically. What “clashes” is culturally/socially determined.

Thoughts?

jeannepompadour: Isabelle de Borchgrave paper recreation of Flora’s dress, from “Primavera” by Bottijeannepompadour: Isabelle de Borchgrave paper recreation of Flora’s dress, from “Primavera” by Bottijeannepompadour: Isabelle de Borchgrave paper recreation of Flora’s dress, from “Primavera” by Bottijeannepompadour: Isabelle de Borchgrave paper recreation of Flora’s dress, from “Primavera” by Bottijeannepompadour: Isabelle de Borchgrave paper recreation of Flora’s dress, from “Primavera” by Botti

jeannepompadour:

Isabelle de Borchgrave paper recreation of Flora’s dress, from “Primavera” by Botticcelli, painted around 1477-82


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Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate Eve’s Glory series by A. TambolyA hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate

Eve’s Glory series by A. Tamboly

A hundred years after the First World War, modern women demonstrate military prestige by donning vintage uniforms historically exclusive to men. Highlighting uniforms from the Second Industrial Revolution until the end of the Weimar Republic, Eve’s Glory compares the ceremonial attitudes historically associated with the military to the proud independence of modern women.

Military uniforms are symbols of heroic and elite social status. The authentic uniforms belong to officers from several countries, symbolizing the strict value system of the period from 1868 to the 1930s. If women had been granted the same status as men, how would they have been perceived? Would society focus on delicate femininity or strength? Melting away the barriers by integrating women into this masculine world, this project questions the gender divide.

I am interested in challenging the conventional ways in which females are visually presented. Women in fashion magazines, TV commercials, and mainstream films are usually dressed in a way that speaks to a structure of social expectations. Characterized by a sharp division between masculinity and femininity, dominance and passivity, toughness and delicacy, women are narrowly defined. A woman in uniform is a visual impossibility.

Showing the contrast between two different worlds—the masculine and the feminine—Eve’s Glory deals with unique characters regardless of age, health, and origin to show women who fought their way through life and the young women who strive for their own path.

—A. Tamboly


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Detail from Portrait of Archduchess Maria Josepha of Austria by Anton Raphael Mengs, 1767

Detail from Portrait of Archduchess Maria Josepha of Austria by Anton Raphael Mengs, 1767


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