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Sicarii Official

Hi my name's Natalie Ironside (she/her). Veteran, big gay, ecosocialist watermelon, former, cult survivor. This is where I compile useful posts and yell about guns, survivalism, and the looming apocalypse. Main is @la-laborista-republiko
Post Total: 13392 Latest posts

The other day I had to explain what a coomer is to my spouse and I think I’ve figured out what the fashbros would say about me if they remembered me

swordsintheforest:

Things left on the vine, and things I took.

solarpunkshoppe:

Hydroponics aint the prettiest, but I love the vibe it gives off

I would just like it known that when I first heard the word “trap house” I thought that it meant something very different

the-last-girl-scout:

I thought about maybe playing Modern Warfare 3 finally but I’m not fucking paying 40 bucks for a decade-old game

I’m just gonna play Stalker again

I thought about maybe playing Modern Warfare 3 finally but I’m not fucking paying 40 bucks for a decade-old game

So I have Some Questions™ about the new calla doody

gallusrostromegalus:

The columnar apple trees, which won’t fruit until 2022, but are notorious over-producers for thier size.


The pallisade peach, which is frankly, showing off. This isn’t even half the fruit it’s trying to produce. Gonna have to prop it’s spindly ass up all summer.


The snap peas which are doing a great job climbing the dinosaurs


And the mixed greens, butter lettuce, red lettuce, spinach and bok choy in the salad bar.

And the four tomato plants.

And the lemon.

And the herbs.

And the onions, if I can figure out how and when to harvest them.

And the Swiss chard.

And the- *checks email* - honeydew melons, romaine lettuce, radishes, green beans, three kinds of potatoes, two kinds of sweet potatoes, another tomato and a mandrin orange mom wants to foist on me.


Husbeast is going to learn all about fresh produce.

gallusrostromegalus:

Husbeast came out and asked “More salad?” With a certain level of dismay because I have been hacking the salad bar back every week and he’s not used to this level of produce and. Sweetie. We’re not even into the crops proper yet. We got:


Cucumbers


Broccolini


Watermelon


Spaghetti squash


Butternut squash


Carrots


Strawberries


Corn


Juvenile Mourning Dove (were not going to eat him but he lives under the shitty porch and is very cute)


The cherries might already be ripe ??

Wait there’s an image limit hang on

gallusrostromegalus:

For those asking: the dinosaurs were 80% off last halloween so i got them for like $20 each and using them to give the snap peas something to grow on and I put “The one on the end with the dinosaurs” on delivery instructions so now they have much less difficulty finding my place. 

I also have a couple fruit trees on the other, shittier porch but Mom called with “I started potatoes and wildflowers and melons and romaine and beans and milkweed and radishes for you!” So I might need to reorganize again to figure out where all these are gonna live.

gallusrostromegalus:

a 10x10ft patio garden in early summer. plants are growing vigorously, laptop and teapot are on a bistro table under an umbrella in the middle

Garden is coming along nicely, had to re-stake my tomatoes and cucumbers. Makes a nice WFH space.

sunbadgerplants:

Potted some tiny veg and herb plugs today

freegan-life:

Quarantine garden part 2: first harvest of the year

Pictured above is: 3 unripe spaghetti squashes, 3 small zucchinis, a pickling cucumber, and many jalapeños I didn’t bother counting or weighing

I purposely picked this harvest early because 1: picking squashes, cucumbers and peppers stimulates the plants to grow a bigger harvest. So I will actually get several, increasingly bigger harvests as this growing season continues. And 2: these fruits are edible when unripe (although the spaghetti squash will be missing it’s signature “nutty” flavor)

Pictured above on the left is my Three Sisters bed as of early June

And pictured above on the right is the adjacent bed where the cucumbers, squash, and zucchini grow. This was originally full of mostly cucumbers but the effect of the polar vortex reached all the way to zone 8 and killed all of the cucumber seedlings but 1. In their places are sweet peppers, tomatoes, and pinto beans.

freegan-life:

Freegan Life Quarantine Garden: Part 1

Above on the left: the beginnings of my first year permaculture raised bed. Here I was laying out paper to block the weeds from coming through. I later laid down soil, then hay and wood chips as mulch. March 19, 2020

Above in the middle: The sprouting of the indigenous American co-planting method, The Three Sisters; corn, beans, and pumpkin. May 9, 2020

Above on the right: The girls are doing well! Only a few weeds come though, and pruning the corn takes minimal effort. May 24, 2020

Important addition: This garden is not as far along, but planted on my mom’s property (that was just mowed weeds before) are beans, sweet corn, melons, squashes, and pumpkin. A good friend of hers (who’s ambition started this project) did the plowing. We seeded, and together we all installed the irrigation system. Now we’re expecting a huge harvest, so when it comes time to it, my mom wants to sell her share of excess crops, while I plan on donating my share to as many anarchist groups who will take it.

plantpest:

finally, the kale can breath again!

i wish i’d taken before photos, but believe me when i say it was so overgrown you couldn’t see the ground. i…. may have been extremely lazy with weeding this summer…. the kale is very stunned as a resault, but as long as we get some i’d say it’s fine enough

freegan-life:

Post-curfew dumpster diving haul ~

Pictured above on the left: a bottle of Chardonnay and a bottle of wine from Tr.ader J.oes

Pictured above on the left: 3 succulents, orchids, and a peace lily plant. These are also from Tra.der Jo.es.

(These finds will be shared with family and friends)

Pictured above on the left: a small portion of the $150 worth of meat plundered from a W.i.nn Di.x.ie (a southern supermarket) dumpster! It was all still cold when we got our hands on it, and the people it will be given to will all be warned it was donated past the ~expiration date~.

Pictured above on the right: onions, potatoes, oranges, and limes from the same dumpster, there were a few bad ones in each bag that I removed before donating.

These finds were given to a local mutual aid group that arose from the pandemic, (and the main organizer is aware I dumpster dive for the things I donate!) And we are now in a mutual agreement to donate food we find together!

Be fruitful and go dumpster diving!

Find your local mutual aid group

What to do with more than you need

Dumpster Diving Safety

Dumpster Diving Safety: Cops

bougainvillieas: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai. Filmmakers: Alan Dater, Lisa Merton, 20bougainvillieas: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai. Filmmakers: Alan Dater, Lisa Merton, 20bougainvillieas: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai. Filmmakers: Alan Dater, Lisa Merton, 20bougainvillieas: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai. Filmmakers: Alan Dater, Lisa Merton, 20bougainvillieas: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai. Filmmakers: Alan Dater, Lisa Merton, 20bougainvillieas: Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai. Filmmakers: Alan Dater, Lisa Merton, 20

bougainvillieas:

Taking Root: The Vision of Wangari Maathai. Filmmakers: Alan Dater,Lisa Merton, 2008.

The documentary tells the inspiring story of the Green Belt Movement of Kenya and its founder Wangari Maathai, the first environmentalist and first African woman to win the Nobel Peace Prize.

The U.S.- educated Professor Maathai discovered her life’s work by reconnecting with the rural women with whom she had grown up. Their lives had become intolerable: they were walking longer distances for firewood, clean water was scarce, the soil was disappearing from their farms, and their children were suffering from malnutrition. Maathai thought to herself, “Well, why not plant trees?” She soon discovered that tree planting had a ripple effect of empowering change. Countering the devastating cultural effects of colonialism, Maathai began teaching communities about self-knowledge as a path to change and community action. The women worked successively against deforestation, poverty, ignorance, embedded economic interests, and violent political oppression. They became a national political force that helped to bring down Kenya’s 24-year dictatorship -Kanopy.


Post link

plantyhamchuk:

There’s something going on with this tree, though we can’t quite agree or decide on what. This is NOT good peach tree growing territory, as the warm winters + late frosts mean that most years, the blooms are taken out by the frosts. Still, this is one of our oldest fruit trees and we have gotten some good crops from it. Not in the past two years though.

I have been working hard on trying to weed under it, as I think it’ll help. V thinks it is doomed, due to bad root stock. It may be. The soil around the base of the tree feels very mushy, as if the roots have rotted. Unlike a potted plant, where you can just flip things over to check out the root system, figuring out root health issues is harder when the tree is in the ground.

It did get one dose of Serenade this spring.

After years of gardening in Atlanta more conventionally, and doing this Food Forest thing in Appalachia, and comparing it to how our other hardcore garden/farm friends are faring, I’m now seeing the pros and cons of different methods. 

If there’s one thing to be said about gardening, there is ALWAYS more to learn. New plants, new methods, new locations, new products, new philosophies. And the gardens themselves are constantly changing, evolving, transitioning to something different. 

When we first planted the fruit trees, they were in our outer zones (a la permaculture). Now the soil near those early fruit trees has been worked and improved the most, getting better every year for annual food production. But the fruit trees are maturing, their canopies spreading, shading out this good soil. Every year the boundary line of what is improved soil / things at least vaguely tended / invasives wacked back is pushed further out.  

It seems like I’m continually chasing sunlight as the trees grow.

So while I’m on board with the concept of permaculture zones (which is basically - the more you’re going to use something / the more it requires tending, place it closer to the home), and think it’s a useful concept, our zones have had to shift and change and now become a bit jumbled as we’ve cleared and worked in such a large space. It might be different if we were on flat land and using heavy machinery instead of doing all this stuff by hand and back, but there’s been a learning curve over the years (+ serious budget considerations). Would I do it differently if I’d known when we first started what I know now? I don’t think so. 

9thbutterfly:

Also made a plan of what to plant where. We’ll see if I’ll stick to it!

Tomorrow is a holiday, so I should even have time to plant.

The advantage of having my own plant nursery is that I can pick up my vegetable plants on the holiday (since I need to go there anywhere to water everything) and if I forget anything, I’ll be there the next day again anyway (and the next and the next and the next and the next and the next hundred or so as well…)

And another advantage is that I can just start everything I want in pots (as long as I hide it from the customers…) and not have to worry about the slugs eating the fresh seedlings. So now I have plenty of “not for sale” bean and pea seedlings among the “for sale” cucumbers and squash.

Hm. Should I sow another tray of carrots, just for myself? More time-consuming but also a higher chance of success than direct sowing.

9thbutterfly:

Vegetable garden progress:

- slug fence

- planted some lettuce as bait to catch the remaining slugs inside the fence

- cut up the boards of the old balcony railing and turned them into paths

- so I’ll probably plant stuff tomorrow

moggiepillar:

When I was about 11, my father was listening to NPR in the car and I was the captive audience in the back seat with no choice but to listen. It was some gardening and/or food themed show and the host was talking about how carrots grown in the winter produce more sugar. This is an evolutionary tactic on the carrot’s part to survive harsh conditions. And that was when this man dropped the most banger line I’ve ever heard. “When you bite into a carrot and it tastes sweet, that’s the carrot saying ‘I don’t want to die.’” I was floored, changed as a person forever. This line haunts me. The poetry. The emotion. NPR made me the sappy garden idiot I am today, romanticizing senescence and over analyzing the science behind vegetables.

wodneswynn:

wodneswynn:

wodneswynn:

Trying to find people you knew in the army sucks shit b/c I only remember everyone’s last name

“Computer, show me Findley.”

“I have found ten hundred brazillian records for Findley.”

*sigh*  “Computer, show me Findley who was in Oklahoma in like 2012?”

*beep boop boop*  “I have found nine hundred brazillian records for Findley.”

*frantically googling “girl with cool hair who was nice to me and I gave her one of my occultism books and I think her first name started with a K or maybe it was C and–”*

wodneswynn:

ehbfrh:

quaxorascal:

wodneswynn:

Hey there, reprobates!  It’s D*cember, which begins the festive War On Christmas season when we all gather around the egg nog tree and roast our chestnuts or what have you.

“Natalie,” you say, “I want to read the hit new post-apocalyptic wasteland adventure trans lesbian romance novel The Last Girl Scout by award-winning speculative fiction author Natalie H. Ironside, but I do not have any moneys and for some reason I haven’t taken you up on your offer to give a free ebook to anybody with a union card.”  Well, fear not!  I, in my infinite benevolence, am doing another one of my famous “events.”

Between now and December 15th of this foul year, all you have to do is reblog this post on the webbed sight Tumblr dot com, and your URL will go into the hat.  Starting on the 16th, I’ll draw five (5) lucky wieners who’ll receive ebook copies of their preferred file type, as well as (wait for it) one (1) lucky wiener whoms’t will get a signed paperback!  Wow!

(I would give away more signed paperbacks but this piece of shit is 600 pages long and shipping would get [Mr. Dink voice] Very Expensive very quickly)

(Also please remember to enable direct messages from non-mutuals if u participate, that was like a Whole Thing last time)

“But Natalie,” I hear you say, “you’re a very cool and smart and beautiful microblogging luminary who is really popular and the best at sports and I would like to read this wonderful book and also support you financially on account of you also do not have any moneys.”  Well, you can do that, too!  You can:

  • Buy on Amazon:
  • Buy on Gumroad:
  • Cashapp five bucks to $NatalieIronside or venmo five bucks to @RennieQueer and include an email address and preferred file type
  • Message me your X number and an email address and preferred file type

Hanukkah simcha and merry War On Christmas!

The past lies like a nightmare over the world.

Two hundred years after the War when atomic fire rained from the skies and burned the world to cinders, human civilization has had time to rebuild within the burned-out husk of Old America.  But the old terrors of the past still persist, and while some work to build a better world, others still dream of reclaiming the glory of the Old World.

In southern Appalachia, political commissar Magnolia Blackadder is sent on a mission into the irradiated Exclusion Zone of Old DC, where an evil that humanity thought it had vanquished centuries ago is waking up and rebuilding its strength.  Along the way, she meets a strange woman with terrible secrets and an unspeakable past, and as they forge a bond and brave the terrors of the wasteland together, she learns that some demons are not so easily exorcised, and that some stones are better left unturned.

In this her debut novel, award-winning author Natalie Ironside delivers a new vision of the post-apocalypse, a tale of adventure, terror, love, and that most basic and most powerful of all human desires:  Freedom.

(cover art by the eternal @soul-hammer​)

[Image: the cover of “The Last Girl Scout” by Natalie Ironside. It features the title in black, blocky font, centred on a textured red field. The words are in a stack; under the first word is a radioactive symbol, under the second are the crossed silhouettes of a pick axe and a hammer, and under the words ‘Girl Scout’ are the silhouettes of a rifle and a canteen. /end ID]

This looks like a fantastic book. I can’t wait for potential future books so I’ve bought it and will be starting it tomorrow as I take a few days to hide in the woods away from humanity.


Thank you, Natalie!

Oh shucks ❤❤

plantanarchy:

Outside plant zones of the moment

Front porch spikey gang! This year’s annual combo and big boy snake plants. Tomato trough ft. two misc cherry tomatoes i grew from seed and flats of baby zinnias and milkweed. The pepper mound. All peppers. In a mound. The shade sail with the last dudes I am transitioning to outside (many haworthia/aloe/gasteria) and an assortment of thrip ridden bastards. The garage shelves with some dudes transitioning to morning sun, some Datura babies, some random seedlings I haven’t bumped up yet. Begonia wall now with more begonias than ever before. Does get some sun in the late afternoon but otherwise is shady and nice.

That’s too many frankly and I am having a good time

gallusrostromegalus:

The columnar apple trees, which won’t fruit until 2022, but are notorious over-producers for thier size.


The pallisade peach, which is frankly, showing off. This isn’t even half the fruit it’s trying to produce. Gonna have to prop it’s spindly ass up all summer.


The snap peas which are doing a great job climbing the dinosaurs


And the mixed greens, butter lettuce, red lettuce, spinach and bok choy in the salad bar.

And the four tomato plants.

And the lemon.

And the herbs.

And the onions, if I can figure out how and when to harvest them.

And the Swiss chard.

And the- *checks email* - honeydew melons, romaine lettuce, radishes, green beans, three kinds of potatoes, two kinds of sweet potatoes, another tomato and a mandrin orange mom wants to foist on me.


Husbeast is going to learn all about fresh produce.

gallusrostromegalus:

Husbeast came out and asked “More salad?” With a certain level of dismay because I have been hacking the salad bar back every week and he’s not used to this level of produce and. Sweetie. We’re not even into the crops proper yet. We got:


Cucumbers


Broccolini


Watermelon


Spaghetti squash


Butternut squash


Carrots


Strawberries


Corn


Juvenile Mourning Dove (were not going to eat him but he lives under the shitty porch and is very cute)


The cherries might already be ripe ??

Wait there’s an image limit hang on

gallusrostromegalus:

For those asking: the dinosaurs were 80% off last halloween so i got them for like $20 each and using them to give the snap peas something to grow on and I put “The one on the end with the dinosaurs” on delivery instructions so now they have much less difficulty finding my place. 

I also have a couple fruit trees on the other, shittier porch but Mom called with “I started potatoes and wildflowers and melons and romaine and beans and milkweed and radishes for you!” So I might need to reorganize again to figure out where all these are gonna live.

gallusrostromegalus:

a 10x10ft patio garden in early summer. plants are growing vigorously, laptop and teapot are on a bistro table under an umbrella in the middle

Garden is coming along nicely, had to re-stake my tomatoes and cucumbers. Makes a nice WFH space.

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