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Let's study Japanese!

Hello, please call me Bites! I study Japanese and want to help you study too! Please check my about for more info (^^
Post Total: 25 Latest posts

japanese-randomstuff:

キッズボンボン for Children” channel

All of the videos on this list have Japanese subtitles. It is mostly in ひらがな and the words are separated. This and the fact that these videos are aimed for children, makes them great for beginners.

All of these videos have an English version on this channel. Search for them or click on this playlist. You can use both versions to study what’s being said.

All of these videos have an English version on this channel. Search for them or click on this playlist. You can use both versions to study what’s being said.

Additional Vocabulary Used:・日本 『にほん』ー Japan・中国 『ちゅうごく』ー China・歌 『うた』ー Song・イスラエル ー Israel・ボードゲーム ー BAdditional Vocabulary Used:・日本 『にほん』ー Japan・中国 『ちゅうごく』ー China・歌 『うた』ー Song・イスラエル ー Israel・ボードゲーム ー BAdditional Vocabulary Used:・日本 『にほん』ー Japan・中国 『ちゅうごく』ー China・歌 『うた』ー Song・イスラエル ー Israel・ボードゲーム ー BAdditional Vocabulary Used:・日本 『にほん』ー Japan・中国 『ちゅうごく』ー China・歌 『うた』ー Song・イスラエル ー Israel・ボードゲーム ー B

Additional Vocabulary Used:
・日本 『にほん』ー Japan
・中国 『ちゅうごく』ー China
・歌 『うた』ー Song
・イスラエル ー Israel
・ボードゲーム ー Board game
・ミュージック ー Music
Hiragana I forgot to include, sorry:
・見る 『みる』ー
・食べる 『たべる』ー
・聞く 『きく』ー

My personal feeling on this Japanese sentence structure is that you should learn and use it as early as possible if you want to have more natural conversations. Despite it being N3 for Japanese learners, it is very basic grammar in general. My host brother who was 7 years old at the time used it so much.

What it can look like in conversation:
My host sister was really excited to take me to Daiso. It’s one of her favorite stores and I had only been in Japan for a month (she most likely assumed I had never been to one because she thought that they only existed in Japan) and it would be my first time going IN JAPAN. So she asks me:

妹:エンジェルちゃん、DAISOに行ったことがありますか?
私:うん、行ったことがあります。
妹:えー!?行ったことがあるよ?
私:うん、カリフォルニアに行く時、DAISOに行きました。だから、DAISOにもう行ったことがあります。

When I lived in Japan I used it often enough to remember and learn it without study aids. There are more in depth ways of using this grammar, of course. Such as if you were not to use a past form it would change the meaning:

ピーナッツを食べないことがありますか? 
Are there times that you do not eat peanuts?

I am not a Japanese language teacher, nor am I fluent or professional. I am a learner and I merely share from my experience and studies. I explain things to help me remember better. :)

My learning style is “less explanation more examples.” Not everyone is like this so here are some other resources that explain ことがる:

maggiesensei is my favorite site, they speak about it in a similar way but they give a ton more examples.

@punipunijapan ‘s explanation from their site.

Click Here to learn more about やる VS. する


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renshyuublog:30日9月2018年今日、ちょっと遅く起きました。 昨夜、友達と電話をして、ビールを飲みましたから。 それは大丈夫ですが、昨日はとても楽しかったです。そして、仕事に行ってrenshyuublog:30日9月2018年今日、ちょっと遅く起きました。 昨夜、友達と電話をして、ビールを飲みましたから。 それは大丈夫ですが、昨日はとても楽しかったです。そして、仕事に行ってrenshyuublog:30日9月2018年今日、ちょっと遅く起きました。 昨夜、友達と電話をして、ビールを飲みましたから。 それは大丈夫ですが、昨日はとても楽しかったです。そして、仕事に行って

renshyuublog:

30日9月2018年

今日、ちょっと遅く起きました。 昨夜、友達と電話をして、ビールを飲みましたから。 それは大丈夫ですが、昨日はとても楽しかったです。そして、仕事に行って、そこでハリーポッターのキャラクターのドビーの耳を見つけました。もちろん、私は友達とその耳をかぶりました。
仕事後で、おもちょ屋さんにパズルを買いに行きました。ディズニーのパズルはすごく難しいです。

メインブログは@myjapanesebites フォローしてください。<3
(Myjapanesebites is my main blog where I reblog, recommend and post other things in regard to Japanese study. I am also making a Japanese self study discord!) 

Maybe you could follow my Japanese dairy entry blog? Could be decent reading practice even if the grammar is not perfect. I’ll try to keep it fun and will even talk about my experiences in Japan.(о´∀`о)


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こんにちは皆さん~!Because I could not find a decent youtube video to do it for me, I will personally tell yo

こんにちは皆さん~!

Because I could not find a decent youtube video to do it for me, I will personally tell you about this little app called Hellotalk 

If you put it in simple terms, it is a language exchange app and an international Facebook without the commitment. You can like and comment on anyone’s post just as they can yours and it’s best to do this in your target language so that any mistakes you make can be correct by native speakers.

With this app you can:

  • Talk to native English, Arabic, Catalan, Danish, Esperanto, French, German, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Persian, Portuguese, Russian, Simplified Chinese, Spanish, Thai, Traditional Chinese, Turkish, and Vietnamese speakers.
  • Correct and be corrected in your target language:

*As you can see my mistakes are crossed out and the corrections are in green making them stand out and see exactly where I went wrong and say that a correction was made that you did not understand. Well; you can message them about it and more often than not they are willing to explain, (sometimes they can only explain in Japanese which is great for you and I–the learners. However; if it is too difficult to understand, the app has a translator that truly rivals google translate, it is that good.)
Here’s an example of me receiving a gracious explanation of a grammar point:

  • You can also send video and audio, and even call with those who speak your target language
  • You can also use the translator at the most convenient of times by clicking the translation button in the corner of messaging or by simply clicking a word, it’s that easy.
  • There is also transliteration. That’s right! This is truly any level friendly. If you can’t fully read your target language just transliterate the comment, reply, etc and you will have the sounds (romaji in the case of Japanese) of what was typed.

You can learn more about the app by visiting the app website which I linked above, so I will not go too deeply into but I want to share just a few tips on how you can really utilize it to improve your target language skills (which I will place under a readmore for the sake of length.)

  1. Make a post everyday
    It’s not hard, and it doesn’t have to be long but make it, and do try not to take more than ten minutes. (depending on length) I say this because I know there are perfectionists out there who look through dictionaries, grammar books, google, etc to get “perfect” grammar because they are afraid of making mistakes. Well in this case; mistakes are your friend, one does not forget being corrected easily. You want to think quickly and use what you know. If you have to constantly look up what you are trying to say then try saying it simpler or talking more simply until you can grasp it easier.
  2. If your level is there correct Japanese speaker’s English and explain your corrections in Japanese.
  3. vise versa, ask a native speaker why they corrected you in Japanese so that they will explain it in Japanese. (You can pick up explanation words that way, it was how I learned.)
  4. Call and talk with natives. Call and talk with natives. Call and talk with natives. Call and talk with natives. The calling system on hellotalk is easy and people want to randomly call all the time. It’s as easy as liking or replying to someone’s post that says something such as; “Who wants to call with me?” I have had several calls this way but I also have a partner who I call every Sunday and Monday. (Finding a partner, someone to chat with everyday is awesome.)
  5. Ask questions on a public post or in private, either way you are likely to get a native answer that you can add to your studies.
  6. Send audio messages/make audio posts when you can, this is really awesome for pronunciation practice because it will all boiled down to whether they understand your pronunciation.
  7. “Favorite” the corrections that you are given for review and actually review them and even discuss them with other native speakers. You will not believe how many different ways there is to say some things and native speakers will have varying ways of correction and it is REALLY important to take that into account and remember that.
  8. Do not be afraid to make mistakes. YOU WILL make mistakes.
  9. Have fun and make friends. Get comfortable using Japanese (or whatever language you’re learning really.) Nothing will make your Japanese more natural than actually being comfortable when you speak it, and this app has such a friendly user interface with users who do not forget what the app is really for. 

All in all, this is not a sponsored post (you can tell with how rushed it is) this app is just awesome and one I use daily and I have legitimately seen improvement in my Japanese since using it. This is just one of the many things that you can do FOR FREE in order to improve your language skills. So just give it a try. Good luck!


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strawblondiestudies:

  1. 会う (あう)- to meet
  2. 開く (あく)- to become open
  3. 開ける (あける)- to open
  4. 上げる (あげる)- to give
  5. 遊ぶ (あそぶ)- to play, to make a visit
  6. あびる - to bathe, to shower
  7. 洗う (あらう)- to wash
  8. ある - to be, to have (inanimate)
  9. 歩く (あるく)- to walk
  10. 言う (いう)- to say
  11. 行く (いく)- to go
  12. 居る (いる)- to be, to have (animate)
  13. 要る (いる)- to need
  14. 入れる (いれる)- to put in
  15. 歌う (うたう)- to sing
  16. 生まれる (うまれる)- to be born
  17. 売る (うる)- to sell
  18. 起きる (おきる)- to get up
  19. 置く (おく)- to put
  20. 教える (おしえる)- to teach, to tell
  21. 押す (おす)- to push, to stamp
  22. 覚える (おぼえる)- to remember
  23. 泳ぐ (およぐ)- to swim
  24. 降りる (おりる)- to get off, to descend
  25. 終わる (おわる)- to finish
  26. 買う (かう)- to buy
  27. 返す (かえす)- to return something
  28. 帰る (かえる)- to return, to go back
  29. かかる - to take time or money
  30. 書く (かく)- to write
  31. かける - to call by phone
  32. 貸す (かす)- to lend
  33. 借りる (かりる)- to borrow
  34. 消える (きえる)- to disappear
  35. 聞く (きく)- to hear, to listen, to ask
  36. 切る (きる)- to cut
  37. 着る (きる)- to put on 
  38. 曇る (くもる)- to become cloudy/dim
  39. 来る (くる)- to come
  40. 消す (けす)- to erase, to turn off
  41. 答える (こたえる)- to answer
  42. コピーする - to copy
  43. 困る (こまる)- to be worried
  44. 咲く (さく)- to bloom
  45. 差す (さす)- to stretch out, to raise
  46. 散歩する (さんぽする)- to stroll
  47. 死ね (しね)- to die
  48. 閉まる (しまる)-  to close, to be closed
  49. 閉める (しめる)- to close something
  50. 締める (しめる)- to tie
  51. 知る (しる)- to know
  52. 吸う (すう)- to smoke
  53. 住む (すむ)- to live in
  54. する - to do
  55. 座る (すわる)- to sit
  56. 掃除する (そうじする)- to clean, to sweep
  57. 出す (だす)- to put out
  58. 立つ (たつ)- to stand
  59. 頼む (たのむ)- to ask
  60. 食べる (たべる)- to eat
  61. 違う (ちがう)- to differ
  62. 使う (つかう)- to use
  63. 疲れる (つかれる)- to get tired
  64. 着く (つく)- to arrive at
  65. 作る (つくる)-to make
  66. つける - to turn on
  67. 勤める (つとめる)- to work for someone
  68. 出かける (でかける)- to go out
  69. できる - to be able to
  70. 出る (でる)- to leave, to go out
  71. 取る (とる)- to take something
  72. 撮る (とる)- to take a photo or film
  73. 鳴く (なく)- to chirp, roar, croak etc
  74. 無くす (なくす)- to lose something
  75. 習う (ならう)- to learn
  76. 並ぶ (ならぶ)- to line up, to stand in line
  77. 並べる (ならべる)- to line up, to set up
  78. なる - to become
  79. 脱ぐ (ぬぐ)- to take off clothes
  80. 寝る (ねる)- to sleep, to go to bed
  81. 登る (のぼる)- to climb
  82. 飲む (のむ)- to drink
  83. 乗る (のる)- to ride, to get on
  84. 入る (はいる)- to enter, to contain
  85. はく - to wear, to put on trousers
  86. 始まる (はじまる)- to begin
  87. 走る (はしる)- to run
  88. 働く (はたらく)- to work
  89. 話す (はなす)- to speak
  90. 貼る (はる)- to stick
  91. 晴れる (はれる)- to be sunny
  92. 引く (ひく)- to pull
  93. 弾く (ひく)- to play an instrument
  94. 吹く (ふく)- to blow (wind)
  95. 降る (ふる)- to fall (rain, snow)
  96. 勉強する (べんきょうする)- to study
  97. 曲がる (まがる)- to turn, to bend
  98. 待つ (まつ)- to wait
  99. 磨く (みがく)- to brush teeth, to polish
  100. 見せる (みせる)- to show
  101. 見る (みる)- to see, to watch, to look
  102. 持つ (もつ)- to hold
  103. 休む (やすむ)- to rest
  104. やる - to do
  105. 行く (ゆく)- to go
  106. 呼ぶ (よぶ)- to call out, to invite
  107. 読む (よむ)- to read
  108. 練習する (れんしゅうする)- to practice
  109. 分かる (わかる)- to be understood
  110. 忘れる (わすれる)- to forget
  111. 渡す (わたす)- to hand over
  112. 渡る (わたる)- to go across

chokopan:

learnjapanesewithme:

The Ultimate Guide To: は vs が

I love Misa’s channel, it’s excellent! She has a really great video explaining relative clauses, with which I struggled a bit.

writeitdownmaka:

writeitdownmaka:

****If there are corrections or additions I should make to this list, please send me a message!****

So I just started using HelloTalk for Japanese, and found out pretty quickly that asking people to help you IN Japanese gets you MUCH better answers so long as you’re up to the challenge of figuring out slightly more complicated explanations! Here are some ways to do that:

THINGS TO ASK

  • Can I ask you a question?
    • ちょっと質問していいですか?
  • How do you say “_____” in Japanese?
    • 「___」は日本語で何と言いますか?
    • 日本語で「___」はどうやって言いますか?
  • What does “_____” mean?
    • 「___」の意味はなんですか?
    • 「___」って、どういう意味ですか?
  • Could you please correct my sentences/check them for errors?
    • 文章を直してください/くれませんか/もらえませんか
    • 間違いがあるかどうかチェックしてもらえますか?
  • What is the difference between “__” and “__”?
    • 「__」と「__」の違いは何ですか?
  • Which one sounds more natural?
    • どちらがもっと自然に聞こえますか?
    • どちらの方が自然ですか?
  • What kind of situation should I use it in?
    • どんな場合に使いますか?
  • Is there another way to say it?
    • 日本語で同じような言い回しがありますか?
  • How would you say it?
    • ___さんなら、これを何と言いますか?
  • Do people normally use this word/phrase?
    • このフレーズ/言葉を普段使いますか?
  • How do I use (this word/phrase)
    • 「___」をどうやって使いますか?
  • Is it similar to/Is it like “_____,” for example?
    • 「___」という事ですか?
    • 「___」と同じような意味ですか?

AND IF U DIDNT REALLY GET THEIR CORRECTIONS/COMMENTS:

  • I’m sorry, I didn’t really understand “_____.” Could you explain it to me?
    • (すみません、「___」はよく分からなくて)、ちょっと説明してもらえませんか?
  • I’m sorry, would you mind explaining your corrections?
    • すみません、訂正を説明してもらえませんか?

OTHER TIPS

  • Say thank you afterward!
  • The sentences above are mostly starting points. The more you talk to people, the more you’ll notice how people ask things like “Oh, can you explain that thing on the bottom?” or “So it’s okay if I say this instead of this?” etc. etc. But these sentences will help you get on your feet!
  • What I sometimes like to do if they’re using really complicated Japanese to explain to me, it try to explain it in my own words and then add っていうことですか? to find out if I’m understanding right!
  • Challenge yourself by answering Japanese-speakers’s questions in Japanese! You’d be surprised how much you can learn about explaining just by reading explanations!

Good luck! Please let me know if you have any questions! <3
頑張ってください!皆さん何か聞きたいことがあったら、何でも聞いてくださいね!<3

-Maka

//typos fixed!

lonelyhanami:

Are you a student? - 学生ですか?
You’re a student? - 学生ですか?

Here we have a problem with 日本語 as a language, we want to ask a question that:
Shows our surprise that they’re a student
Subtly asks for more info on them being a student
But there isn’t really a way to structure a sentence that conveys this.

For this, we use the particle.

  • 学生-がくせい-Student
  • あの-That (over there)
  • 男の子-おとこのこ-Boy
  • 人気-にんき-Popular


I’m going to remove everything except the 学生 to keep it in the impolite form, as this is simpler than polite.
学生? - Are you a student?
学生な?-You’re a student?
Remember the な is added because 学生 is a noun, and in generally you add な before a particle if you’re talking about a noun or na-adjective.
Here’s an example using an i-adjective, you don’t add な.
かわいい?- You’re cute? (笑)

You can actually use の as a way of explaining yourself, or to answer a question.
If someone asks “That boy is popular?” You can say:
あの男の子人気な? - (That boy is popular?)
かわいい。 - (It is that he’s cute.)

For the polite form, you should replace の with ん.
学生ですか? - You’re a student?

If you see any errors please DM me :)
Try practicing it in the replies^^

learnjp:Have to, Need to, Must || 必要がある・なくてはいけないHey guys! In the past we’ve had a look at when you

learnjp:

Have to, Need to, Must || 必要がある・なくてはいけない

Hey guys! In the past we’ve had a look at when you want something or want to do something as well as the conditionals if/when (something happens). Today we’re gonna look at how to say that you really have to, need to, or must do something!

The two important phrases for this lesson are;

  • ~必要がある・ひつようがある・Need
  • ~なくてはいけない・Must

However you can often see these phrases as being translated as “have to do”.

An easy way to understand the difference or when to use which phrase, would be to consider that 「~必要がある」has a more formal and instructional tone to it, while「~なくてはいけない」has a more casual and personal tone to it.

You could also look at the difference between these two phrases as being 「~なくてはいけない」implies that you should do this in order to move forward, while 「~必要がある」implies that you have to do this in order to move forward.

Take for example the definitions given by the online dictionary Jisho:

  • 必要・necessary; needed; essential; indispensable
    e.g.私達が生きていくためには衣食住が必要です。
    Weneedfood, clothes and a home in order to live.

  • なくてはいけない・cannot do without something; indispensable; absolutely necessary
    e.g.君はもう大人なんだから、もっと分別がなくてはいけない
    Now that you are grown-up, you ought to know better.

Other examples:
クレーンを操縦するのには、勿論、免許が必要です。
Of course, a license is needed to operate a crane.

そのボルトに嵌合するナットが必要です。
Weneeda nut that will fit that bolt.

トランプをするのにもう一人必要だ。
Weneed another person to play cards.

宿題をしなくてはいけません。 
Ihave to do my homework.

でもさ、母を連れて行かなくてはいけないんだ
But, I have to take my mother.

彼は時計を修理しなくてはいけない
Hehas to repair the clock.


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“Most people when they study, they are very passive. They are reading things and they are listening to things but they aren’t actually practicing on PRODUCING the language.”

This youtuber is my biggest inspiration and why I’m starting Japanese from zero with Genki I revision. These are such good tips and I highly recommend taking her advice. 

Going to attempt to start this blog up from zero starting with Hiragana and Katakana charts from tofGoing to attempt to start this blog up from zero starting with Hiragana and Katakana charts from tof

Going to attempt to start this blog up from zero starting with Hiragana and Katakana charts from tofugu (a site with an abundance of Japanese language resources.)

Practice Charts for Hiragana: 
http://happylilac.net/hiragana-50.html

Practice Charts for Katakana (Scroll down a bit): 
https://print-kids.net/print/poster/katakana-aiueo/

Practice with games!
http://www.mybenkyo.com/hiragana-games/

Sound chart for pronunciation:
Click this sentence to access maggiesensei’s dot come online audio chart

Tips (Feel free to share your own!): Some people say not to write them but in my opinion it is best to do so and not only get it out of the way but it had helped me remember faster when I wrote them and even in Japan children practice through written and verbal repetition. These practices include the stroke order, do not waste your time writing them out if you plan to dismiss the stroke order which can be seen in the practice charts in the links provided.

The five a day method is great and effective but slow paced, feel free to bring it to ten a day and learn even quicker. Play some of the games in the links above to have fun with your learning.

https://www.memrise.com/ has an abundance of flash cards for not only hiragana and katakana but for grammar and kanji as well. I highly recommend you use it in your studies.

Say them aloud when ever possible.

Stay consistent be intent in your study and learn effectively~


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Well, it was a little more than three but anyway-I’d be surprised if any of you actually remember thWell, it was a little more than three but anyway-I’d be surprised if any of you actually remember thWell, it was a little more than three but anyway-I’d be surprised if any of you actually remember thWell, it was a little more than three but anyway-I’d be surprised if any of you actually remember thWell, it was a little more than three but anyway-I’d be surprised if any of you actually remember thWell, it was a little more than three but anyway-I’d be surprised if any of you actually remember th

Well, it was a little more than three but anyway-I’d be surprised if any of you actually remember this blog and it’s purpose but just as a refresher; I go by Bites, I am 21 years old and I started this blog when I was 16 years old in order to learn Japanese and help others learn it with me. (I did not know I would be going to Japan at the time, I just LOVE Japanese and wanted to learn.)

As you can tell by looking through the blog, I wasn’t very good at helping but boy was I enthusiastic!

This was the description of my blog when I first started it: “Hello I am learning Japanese! I am a big beginner! I am now focusing on Kanji, and speaking (grammar) please correct me if I make any mistakes. If you’d like you can join me!^u^
I also would love to help in anyway that I can!
よろしく!”

And I still can’t believe that it’s me because last year, I returned from a year long high school exchange in Japan!(There is a strange story as to how I went as a 19 year old ha ha) That’s right, I lived in Japan and after taking a year long break from all things Japanese, I have come to realize that I am forgetting soooo much Japanese!  In the time that I have been gone, my Japanese level had reached that of N3! Even I cannot believe it. Now however, I have forgotten too much and I am determined to become fluent so I must study harder than ever before.

Now, I am reviewing all of my textbooks. That’s right, starting with Genki I and if you’d like, you can join me! Follow this blog or be sure to keep an eye on the tag jpdiscordserver in the near future for a discord server that will change the way you see Japanese self study. There are no gimmicks or fees, all I ask is that you join with the desire to truly learn/study Japanese, no matter your level (It does lean more towards beginner friendly though.)

I am proof that if you study you can achieve, just cut the excuses and go go go!


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sweetieslearnjapanese:

  • English        Progressive       Hiragana/Katakana      Kanji +

pillow                     makura                     まくら                 枕

bed                        beddo                     ベッド                ベッド

futon                      futon                       ふとん                布団

blanket                   moufu                       もうふ                毛布

towel                      taoru                      タオル              タオル

bath                       ofuro                        おふろ               お風呂

soap                       sekken                     せっけん             石けん

toothbrush               haburashi                 ハブラシ             ブラシ

mirror                      kagami                     かがみ               鏡

window                    mado                       まど                  窓

fuckyeahnativejapanese:お化け「おばけ」| goblin; ghost魔女「まじょ」| witch怖い「こわい」| scary夜「よる」| nightお化け屋敷「おば

fuckyeahnativejapanese:

お化け「おばけ」| goblin; ghost
魔女「まじょ」| witch
怖い「こわい」| scary
夜「よる」| night
お化け屋敷「おばけやしき」| haunted house
殺人「さつじん」| murder
ハロウィーン | Halloween
ゾンビ | zombie
血「ち」| blood
死「し」| death


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